kt-60h

James Ward, R.A. (1769-1859)

Study of a helmet

James Ward, study of helmet

Signed with initials l.r.: JW.RA and inscribed with artist’s shorthand, pencil
27.1 x 25 cm

Provenance
Probably by descent in the artist’s family to Edith Winifred Jackson, Ward’s great granddaughter;
Thomas H. Knowles, 1932, and by descent to his son T.W. Knowles, 1956, by whom given to
Prudence Summerhayes Turner, a descendant of the artist, and by descent in her family until 2017

This is probably a British military helmet, most likely from a horse guards’ regiment.

Study of a collar and epaulette, probably of the Life Guards Cossack regiment

Ward drawing

Signed with initials and inscribed with the artist’s shorthand, pencil
19 x 26.8 cm

Provenance
Probably by descent in the artist’s family to Edith Winifred Jackson, Ward’s great granddaughter;
Thomas H. Knowles, 1932, and by descent to his son T.W. Knowles, 1956, by whom given to
Prudence Summerhayes Turner, a descendant of the artist, and by descent in her family until 2017

The shorthand used by Ward was invented by William Holdsworth and William Aldridge. It was first published in 1766 as:’ Natural Short-hand, wherein the nature of speech and the manner of pronunciation are briefly explained’. Ward used it principally to record colour notes and other observations which would be useful when working from his sketches later in his studio.