Skip to content
kt-60h

James Ward, RA (British, 1769–1859)

Portrait of Tamorfait Carnborloff

10 ward ktfa_170502_cossack_10 ward ktfa_170502_cossack_-800

Signed in pen and brown ink with initials and dated l.r.: JW.RA./July.1814-, inscribed: Cossack/Tamorfait. Carborlof/King Street Barracks, and again l.c.: It was stated that this man killed/ 14 Frenchmen one morn.g [sic] before breakfast-, pencil

29.4 x 22.4 cm

This is a study for a figure in an oil painting, commissioned by the Duke of Northumberland, entitled Portraits of Prince Platoff’s favourite charger and of Four of his Cossacks (in the collection of the Duke of Northumberland, Alnwick Castle). This oil was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1815 (no. 148).

After Napoleon’s defeat in April 1814 and the ensuing Treaty of Fontainebleau and Peace of Paris, the Prince Regent invited the Allied sovereigns, including Emperor Alexander I of Russia, to London from 6 to 27 June. There were great festivities and the Emperor threw a lavish levée at the house of the Duke of Cumberland which cost £25,000.

Alexander I was accompanied by members of his retinue, who were housed in King Street Barracks (home to the Royal Life Guards) to the north of Portman Square. Their distinctive costumes aroused much comment. Ward clearly shared this interest as he depicted this soldier on at least four other occasions. There is another head and shoulders drawing of him in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge (which originally belonged to the Duke of Wellington, P D41-1991) and a full-length study of him seated in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford (WA1938.107). Further examples of drawings and sketches of his colleague Gregory Yelloserf are in the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven and in a private collection. An oil of Matvei Ivanovitch, Count Platov in the uniform of a Cossack general by Peter Edward Stroehling (1768–c. 1826), which was probably commissioned by George IV, is in the Royal Collection.

Provenance: Christie’s London, 6 February 1968, lot 23, to Christopher Powney, by whom sold to Walter Brandt; Sold by his descendants, Sotheby’s, London, 7–8 July 2011, lot 246 (£11,250)

Study of a helmet

James Ward, study of helmet

Signed with initials l.r.: JW.RA and inscribed with artist’s shorthand, pencil
27.1 x 25 cm

Provenance
Probably by descent in the artist’s family to Edith Winifred Jackson, Ward’s great granddaughter;
Thomas H. Knowles, 1932, and by descent to his son T.W. Knowles, 1956, by whom given to
Prudence Summerhayes Turner, a descendant of the artist, and by descent in her family until 2017

This is probably a British military helmet, most likely from a horse guards’ regiment.

Study of a collar and epaulette, probably of the Life Guards Cossack regiment

Ward drawing

Signed with initials and inscribed with the artist’s shorthand, pencil
19 x 26.8 cm

Provenance
Probably by descent in the artist’s family to Edith Winifred Jackson, Ward’s great granddaughter;
Thomas H. Knowles, 1932, and by descent to his son T.W. Knowles, 1956, by whom given to
Prudence Summerhayes Turner, a descendant of the artist, and by descent in her family until 2017

The shorthand used by Ward was invented by William Holdsworth and William Aldridge. It was first published in 1766 as:’ Natural Short-hand, wherein the nature of speech and the manner of pronunciation are briefly explained’. Ward used it principally to record colour notes and other observations which would be useful when working from his sketches later in his studio.